© Site design & Admin by English Specialty Arts … copyrighted, all rights reserved

About ...   

Bear Who Talks Much - Itswoot Wawa Hyiu

Roy

Wilson’s

father

was

an

enrolled

allottee

of

the

Yakima

Indian

Reservation.

 His

mother

was

a

non-Indian.

 Roy

is

an

enrolled

member

of

the

federally

recognized

Cowlitz

Indian

Tribe.

 He

has

Cowlitz,

Chinook,

Yakama, and Iroquois blood.  

He

served

on

the

tribal

council

for

32

years.

 The

first

ten

years,

1971-1981,

he

served

as

Chairman

of

the

Cowlitz

Tribe’s

General

Council,

and

the

last

nine

years

as

Chairman

of

the

Tribal

Council.

 He

currently

serves

as

the

Honorary

Chief

of

the

tribe,

the

tribal

spiritual

leader,

chairman

of

the

tribal

Cultural

Resources

Board, and Director of the tribal Language Department.

He

has

served

as

chairman

of

the

Board

of

Directors

for

the

Small

Tribe’s

organization

of

Western

Washington,

on

the

Washington

State

Governor’s

Indian

Advisory

Council,

a

member

of

the

National

Board

of

Directors

of

the

Coalition

of

Indian

Controlled

School

Boards,

on

committees

for

the

National

Congress

of

American

Indians,

a

member

of

the

Affiliated

Tribes

of

Northwest

Indians,

Indian

tribal

representative

on

the

Religious

Advisory

Committee

for

the

Washington

State

Department

of

Corrections,

and

Indian

representative for the Washington State  Board of Geographical Names.

Roy

is

a

retired

ordained

United

Methodist

clergyman,

and

has

served

as

a

college

professor,

seminary

professor,

National

secretary

for

the

Executive

Committee

of

the

Native

American

International

Caucus

of

the

United

Methodist

Church,

Chairman

of

the

Inter-ethnic

caucus

of

the

Pacific

Northwest

Conference

of

the

United

Methodist

Church,

Chairman

of

the

Native

American

Ministries

Committee

of

the

Pacific

Northwest

Conference

of

the

United

Methodist

Church,

member

of

the

Board

of

Managers

for

St.

Paul’s

School

of

Theology,

a

member

of

the

Native

American

Advisory

Committee

for

the

United

Methodist

Publishing

House,

a

member

of

the

Board

of

Directors

for

the

National

United

Methodist

Native

American

Center,

a

member

of

the

Native

American

Task

Force

of

the

Church

Council

of

Greater

Seattle,

and

a

community

member

on

the

Editorial Board of the Bremerton Sun.

Roy has written 33 books.  He has sixteen grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren.

About ... The Medicine Wheel

There

is

the

Mayan

Medicine

Wheel,

the

Inca

Wheel,

the

Cherokee

Wheel,

the

Red

Road-Black

Road

Medicine

Wheel, and numerous others.

We

recognize

the

Sundance

Medicine

Wheel

as

we

perceive

Grandfather

Sun’s

dance

around

the

Earth

Mother.

Grandfather

Sun

always

rises

in

the

East

beginning

a

new

day

and

gives

us

the

many

teachings

about life’s new beginnings.  There are many other teachings from this direction.  

Grandfather

Sun

then

DANCES

around

to

the

South

where

it

reaches

its

apex

of

the

day’s

journey

at

high

noon,

the

time

of

the

day

when

we

sense

its

heat

the

greatest.

 Here

we

receive

the

teachings

of

warmth

and

heat: the passions, love, anger, the emotions, and the will along with many other lessons.

Grandfather

then

dances

around

to

the

West

where

he

sets

bringing

on

the

darkness

of

night,

the

time

of

introspection

with

its

teachings.

 Grandfather

then

dances

around

to

the

North,

the

direction

from

which

the

storms come, giving us teachings how to face the storms of life.

The

outer

wheel

is

the

human

part

of

the

wheel

with

all

of

our

personal

totem

powers.

The

center

of

the

wheel

is

the

Sacred

Altar

and

dwelling

place

of

the

Great

Spirit

(God).

The

inner

wheel

has

the

Great

Spirit’s

totem

powers.

There

are

pathways

from

each

of

the

four

directions

into

the

Sacred

Altar

with

the

teachings

of

how

we can journey from our outer human wheel to experience the God within us.

This

Sundance

Medicine

Wheel

is

like

an

Indian

Bible

with

all

of

the

teachings

for

life

contained

within

it;

the

teachings for our sociological, spiritual, physical, and intellectual life are in this wheel.

© Site design & Admin by English Specialty Arts copyrighted, all rights reserved

About ...   

Bear Who Talks Much - Itswoot Wawa

Hyiu

Roy

Wilson’s

father

was

an

enrolled

allottee

of

the

Yakima

Indian

Reservation.

 His

mother

was

a

non-Indian.

 Roy

is

an

enrolled

member

of

the

federally

recognized

Cowlitz

Indian

Tribe.

 He

has

Cowlitz, Chinook, Yakama, and Iroquois blood.  

He

served

on

the

tribal

council

for

32

years.

 The

first

ten

years,

1971-1981,

he

served

as

Chairman

of

the

Cowlitz

Tribe’s

General

Council,

and

the

last

nine

years

as

Chairman

of

the

Tribal

Council.

 He

currently

serves

as

the

Honorary

Chief

of

the

tribe,

the

tribal

spiritual

leader,

chairman

of

the

tribal

Cultural

Resources

Board,

and Director of the tribal Language Department.

He

has

served

as

chairman

of

the

Board

of

Directors

for

the

Small

Tribe’s

organization

of

Western

Washington,

on

the

Washington

State

Governor’s

Indian

Advisory

Council,

a

member

of

the

National

Board

of

Directors

of

the

Coalition

of

Indian

Controlled

School

Boards,

on

committees

for

the

National

Congress

of

American

Indians,

a

member

of

the

Affiliated

Tribes

of

Northwest

Indians,

Indian

tribal

representative

on

the

Religious

Advisory

Committee

for

the

Washington

State

Department

of

Corrections,

and

Indian

representative

for

the

Washington

State

 Board

of

Geographical Names.

Roy

is

a

retired

ordained

United

Methodist

clergyman,

and

has

served

as

a

college

professor,

seminary

professor,

National

secretary

for

the

Executive

Committee

of

the

Native

American

International

Caucus

of

the

United

Methodist

Church,

Chairman

of

the

Inter-ethnic

caucus

of

the

Pacific

Northwest

Conference

of

the

United

Methodist

Church,

Chairman

of

the

Native

American

Ministries

Committee

of

the

Pacific

Northwest

Conference

of

the

United

Methodist

Church,

member

of

the

Board

of

Managers

for

St.

Paul’s

School

of

Theology,

a

member

of

the

Native

American

Advisory

Committee

for

the

United

Methodist

Publishing

House,

a

member

of

the

Board

of

Directors

for

the

National

United

Methodist

Native

American

Center,

a

member

of

the

Native

American

Task

Force

of

the

Church

Council

of

Greater

Seattle,

and

a

community

member on the Editorial Board of the Bremerton Sun.

Roy

has

written

33

books.

 He

has

sixteen

grandchildren

and

22

great-grandchildren.

About ... The Medicine Wheel

There

is

the

Mayan

Medicine

Wheel,

the

Inca

Wheel,

the

Cherokee

Wheel,

the

Red

Road-Black

Road

Medicine

Wheel,

and

numerous

others.

We

recognize

the

Sundance

Medicine

Wheel

as

we

perceive

Grandfather

Sun’s

dance

around

the

Earth

Mother.

Grandfather

Sun

always

rises

in

the

East

beginning

a

new

day

and

gives

us

the

many

teachings

about

life’s

new

beginnings.

 There

are

many

other

teachings from this direction.  

Grandfather

Sun

then

DANCES

around

to

the

South

where

it

reaches

its

apex

of

the

day’s

journey

at

high

noon,

the

time

of

the

day

when

we

sense

its

heat

the

greatest.

 Here

we

receive

the

teachings

of

warmth

and

heat:

the

passions,

love,

anger,

the

emotions, and the will along with many other lessons.

Grandfather

then

dances

around

to

the

West

where

he

sets

bringing

on

the

darkness

of

night,

the

time

of

introspection

with

its

teachings.

 Grandfather

then

dances

around

to

the

North,

the

direction

from

which

the

storms

come,

giving

us

teachings

how

to

face the storms of life.

The

outer

wheel

is

the

human

part

of

the

wheel

with

all

of

our

personal

totem

powers.

The

center

of

the

wheel

is

the

Sacred

Altar

and

dwelling

place

of

the

Great

Spirit

(God).

The

inner

wheel

has

the

Great

Spirit’s

totem

powers.

There

are

pathways

from

each

of

the

four

directions

into

the

Sacred

Altar

with

the

teachings

of

how

we

can

journey

from

our

outer

human

wheel

to

experience

the

God

within us.

This

Sundance

Medicine

Wheel

is

like

an

Indian

Bible

with

all

of

the

teachings

for

life

contained

within

it;

the

teachings

for

our

sociological,

spiritual,

physical,

and

intellectual

life

are

in

this

wheel.